Glendale Animal Hospital

1144 Main St
Glendale Heights, IL 60139

(630)858-3530

glendaleanimal.com

Welcome to Glendale Animal Hospital

Glendale Animal Hospital is a well-established, full-service, small animal veterinary hospital providing comprehensive medical, surgical and dental care. We've been helping pets from the communities of Glendale Heights, Glen Ellyn, Bloomingdale, Lombard, Wheaton and Carol Stream for the last twenty years.

We provide a broad spectrum of diagnostic procedures through in-house testing and the use of external laboratories. We also work closely with local practices when special diagnostic procedures are required. The facility includes a well-stocked pharmacy, in-hospital surgery suite, in-house x-ray capabilities, a closely supervised hospitalization area, and indoor boarding kennels with outdoor walking areas.

At Glendale Animal Hospital we strive to offer not only sound advice, but also optimal veterinary care, thus allowing you the enjoyment of your companion for a maximum number of years. Our job is not only to treat your pet when he or she isn't feeling well, but also to help you learn how to keep your best friend happy and healthy.

We invite you to click on the following links to learn more about our practice, our services, our pet library and more! 

 

 

 


 

Introducing Our New Hospital...

Glendale Animal Hospital would like to announce that our new hospital will open on May 30, 2017. As we enter the final stage of construction we ask everyone to remain patient with the restricted parking until our grand re-opening in September. We will be asking our clients to park behind the new hospital and use the side entrance until the front of hospital is complete. The new hospital allows us to continue to provide the very best care possible. We will have a separate cat-friendly entrance, waiting room, and a designated exam room for our feline patients. Our new hospital will be equipped with the latest digital technology and dedicated suites for surgery, dental procedures, and radiology. Our patient care team can continue to provide the best care possible with our improved treatment area and our new glass enclosed ICU recovery center. And most importantly, to show our gratitude we have finally installed a public restroom because we care about YOU as much as our patients!

 

 

 

Grain-Free Pet Foods: Fact vs Fiction

MARCH 2017 
CLINICAL  
PEER REVIEWED
Print/View PDF

The good news—pet owners are increasingly focusing on their pets’ nutrition. The not-so- good news—they are reading about niche diets on the internet.

According to US Bureau of Labor and Statistics data, the pet food market is on a growth trajectory, with $29.5 billion spent on pet food in 2015,1 including in some growing niche markets such as grain-free diets.

Many pet owners believe grain-free diets are better for their pets because they assume they are more natural, carbohydrate-free, and less likely to result in health problems such as allergies, but this is notthe case.

Better for Pets?

No credible evidence has been found showing grain-free diets are better for pets, nor do any nutritional foundations support this claim. Therefore, veterinary healthcare teams need to educate pet owners about the definition of nutrition and the difference between nutrients and ingredients. The Misperceptions

Pet owners frequently encounter misinformation about grains in pet foods. Here are some of the most common misperceptions:

  • Whole grains may be fillers in pet foods:

Filler implies the ingredient has little or no nutritional value,2,3 but whole grains do contribute vital nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and essential fatty acids to pet foods.4 Various grain products also provide protein, which may be easier for the pet to digest than some proteins from meat. Most dogs and cats (>90%) can utilize and digest nutrients from grains normally found in pet foods.2-4

  • Grain-free pet foods are carbohydrate-free: 

Grain-free pet foods typically contain carbohydrates from other sources such as sweet potatoes, which have a higher carbohydrate level than corn. Grains are carbohydrates, which are an important energy source, and one of the 6 basic nutrients (ie, water, protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals).

Veterinary teams must remember that the variety of grain-free diets on the market means a variety of nutritional profiles, which affects not only carbohydrates but also protein, fat, and other nutrients. Grain-free diets lower in carbohydrates may indicate a higher amount of fat and calories. Some grain-free diets merely substitute grain with highly refined starches (eg, potatoes, cassava) that may deliver fewer nutrients and less fiber than whole grains and are not considered cost-efficient.4 In other grain-free products, the grains are replaced with beans, peas, or lentils, which may provide carbohydrates but are not necessarily any better for pets than grains and may lead to GI upset. 

  • Grains cause food allergies: Food allergies and insensitivities are abnormal responses to a normal food or ingredient.5 Food allergies in pets are uncommon (ie, <1% of skin disease, <10% of all allergies6,7) and grain allergies are even more uncommon. The significant factors in the few pets diagnosed with a food allergy are more likely animal protein (eg, chicken, beef, dairy),8 which reflects the commonality of ingredients in pet foods rather than their increased tendency to cause allergies.
  • Grains cause gluten intolerance: Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disease seen in humans that has been associated with hypersensitivity to gluten proteins in wheat and related grains such as barley and rye. Gluten intolerance is extremely rare in dogs and nonexistent in cats. Only one inbred family of Irish Setters is known to have manifested GI signs from consuming gluten.9

Conclusion

The growing grain-free category of the expanding pet food market is perpetuating the misperception that grain is bad for pets. Also, pet owners increasingly consider their pet’s diet as important as their own. Consequently, various human food trends have found their way into the pet food market, especially those believed to center on pets’ wellness. Remember, grain-free diets offer no more health benefits than a diet with grains, and each diet should be considered based on the overall nutrient profile rather than individual ingredients. However, some owners will adamantly believe their pet should eat only grain-free food; the veterinary team should follow pet food selection recommendations (see Resources) and apply the recommendations to the grain-free pet foods that are available. Veterinary team members need to focus on nutrition as medicine aimed at maintaining wellness, managing diseases, and strengthening the human–animal bond by helping pets live long, healthy lives.